In 1986, the organization entered into an agreement with a private company for the operation of the security system. Prepositions have the ability to focus on verbs and turn them into prepositional verbs (or « two words »), even though it seems that verbs went well without the preposition. It`s something my daughter and I exchange notes on. Some examples that are used: to reach an agreement on a subject on which people had different opinions When companies try to save money, loyalty to workers is not taken. I therefore understand the idea that entering into a contract might be superfluous. But English is full of legitimate two-word verbs. (Click here for an entire dictionary.) And I would never have thought of saying, « Acme and Widgetco have entered into a merger agreement. » to make a deal, or to end a dispute with someone to make a win/deal/deal, etc. safe or complete Based on MSCD, I guess you`d say the parties will make a deal, Instead of taking them. (See .

B MSCD 2.21 and 8.18.) Previous use is certainly common and just as certainly redundant. Why not just type? I could be influenced by popular usage, but Google offered me 143,000 results for « a contract concluded » and 1,260,000 results for « a contract concluded. Doing something like an agreement or agreement by which both parties get an advantage or an advantage Tom`s concern is that, because entering means « entering », it would be useless to go with him. But the best thing is not to be too literal when dealing with two-word verbs. For example, consider going back to what it means to « arrive unexpectedly, » as in « He showed up at my house tuesday morning. » I challenge you to arrive at this meaning by combining the respective meanings of linement and installation. So I stay at the inside. But I invite you, dear reader, to vote in the following poll. Declare itself ready to be part of an official agreement or treaty The government had begun a real dialogue with the terrorists. . do something after discussing it or thinking about it for a long time « Rest.

. . .